Install Theme

Kickstart an Urban Orchard in Richmond


Some folks here at Martin have partnered with Enrichmond & Blue Bee Cider to create a community apple orchard downtown:

David Vogaleer:

But before we can plant the trees, we have to clear the land. That’s where the “kids” come in. Instead of using heavy equipment or chemicals to clear the land out, we want to use goats. Lots of goats. And I’ve seen them in action, they can tear some through shrubbery.

We are hoping to raise $5k by the end of our kickstarter campaign to pay for the goats, and we have some really cool prizes to go along with backing it.

Great to see the agency doing good here in the city. David also worked on an incredible interactive mural a few months back. I wrote a post about it but it was eaten by the Squarespace sarlacc.

Don’t you want to help pay for some goats? At least read about it. You’ll be glad you did!

Go here to pitch in or read more about it.

The Martin Agency Kitchen

The agency is starting up a great new program for creative “types” looking to spend a few months inside an agency making awesome stuff:



Combine 15 overachieving prodigies from the worlds of art, copy, design, film, digital and business, give ‘em actual real-world assignments and you get The Martin Agency Kitchen. No, we won’t bore you with culinary-puns and hackneyed cooking metaphors. Although that would be kinda fun.

We’re here to throw down the gauntlet and ask you if you’re up for the challenge to blow people’s minds with the kickassest of kickass work EVER CREATED.

So are you ready to bring the pain for three months and come home with three completed projects like: a killer music video, new business, branded apps, art installations and alien-grade inventions? Then read on, amigos.

Check it out here: martinagencykitchen.com

Disclaimer: I’m still waiting for my tailored pants.

The Martin Agency Kitchen

The agencyis starting up a great new program for creative “types” looking to spend a few months inside an agency making awesome stuff:



Combine 15 overachieving prodigies from the worlds of art, copy, design, film, digital and business, give ‘em actual real-world assignments and you get The Martin Agency Kitchen. No, we won’t bore you with culinary-puns and hackneyed cooking metaphors. Although that would be kinda fun.

We’re here to throw down the gauntlet and ask you if you’re up for the challenge to blow people’s minds with the kickassest of kickass work EVER CREATED.

So are you ready to bring the pain for three months and come home with three completed projects like: a killer music video, new business, branded apps, art installations and alien-grade inventions? Then read on, amigos.

Check it out here: martinagencykitchen.com

Disclaimer: I’m still waiting for my tailored pants.

The Martin Agency Kitchen

The agency is starting up a great new program for creative “types” looking to spend a few months inside an agency making awesome stuff:



Combine 15 overachieving prodigies from the worlds of art, copy, design, film, digital and business, give ‘em actual real-world assignments and you get The Martin Agency Kitchen. No, we won’t bore you with culinary-puns and hackneyed cooking metaphors. Although that would be kinda fun.

We’re here to throw down the gauntlet and ask you if you’re up for the challenge to blow people’s minds with the kickassest of kickass work EVER CREATED.

So are you ready to bring the pain for three months and come home with three completed projects like: a killer music video, new business, branded apps, art installations and alien-grade inventions? Then read on, amigos.

Check it out here: martinagencykitchen.com

Disclaimer: I’m still waiting for my tailored pants.

The Martin Agency Kitchen

The agency is starting up a great new program for creative “types” looking to spend a few months inside an agency making awesome stuff:



Combine 15 overachieving prodigies from the worlds of art, copy, design, film, digital and business, give ‘em actual real-world assignments and you get The Martin Agency Kitchen. No, we won’t bore you with culinary-puns and hackneyed cooking metaphors. Although that would be kinda fun.

We’re here to throw down the gauntlet and ask you if you’re up for the challenge to blow people’s minds with the kickassest of kickass work EVER CREATED.

So are you ready to bring the pain for three months and come home with three completed projects like: a killer music video, new business, branded apps, art installations and alien-grade inventions? Then read on, amigos.

Check it out here: martinagencykitchen.com

Disclaimer: I’m still waiting for my tailored pants.

Bill Watterson: Repetition is the death of magic

When asked why he stopped making Calvin and Hobbes: ​

You can’t really blame people for preferring more of what they already know and like. The trade-off, of course, is that predictability is boring. Repetition is the death of magic.

I never got into Calvin and Hobbes, although it seems like something I would’ve really liked if I took the time. You’ve got to give it to someone who knows when it’s time to stop and has the courage to actually do it.

𝌆

When will Facebook be overrun by the dead?

Adage ran a story today (that I happened to see while deleting their unopened email) about teens leaving Facebook but Facebook still having more teens than anyone else.

Marketing and agency people get nervous about things like this because Facebook is an easy way to put impressive looking numbers on charts alongside words like engagement, social, and digital. Facebook is the beard of the marketing world. Companies that are incredibly traditional in thinking can fool their board memebers and stock holders into thinking they’re with it and engaging with millennials.

Anyways, I thought the Adage story contrasted nicely with a post that Kottke linked to that tries to work out the point at which Facebook has more profiles for the dead than the living.

Based on the site’s growth rate, and the age breakdown of their users over time,[2] there are probably 10 to 20 million people who created Facebook profiles who have since died.

These people are, at the moment, spread out pretty evenly across the age spectrum. Young people have a much lower death rate than people in their sixties or seventies, but they make up a substantial share of the dead on Facebook simply because there have been so many of them using it.

It’s nice to know that we’ll all end up on the winning team.

Cognitive Dissonance and Video Games

Jamie Madigan on whether he would’ve liked Dead Space 3 more if he paid full price for a new copy rather than buying used:

Now, I had really liked the first two Dead Space games, but after just a few hours of tromping through another space station fighting more necromorphs, I felt completely bored. I didn’t like it. I stopped playing.

This made me think about the subjects in Festinger’s experiment, and whether or not I might be feeling the lack of cognitive dissonance. Or more to the point, if I had paid $60 for Dead Space 3, would I have convinced myself that I was enjoying it, rather than face the fact that I had decided to spend all that money on a full priced game? Even worse, would I have gone online to told people who didn’t like the game that they were wrong and that all their arguments were invalid?

Probably. A little, at least. Research on cognitive dissonance theory and consumer choice exploded4 in the 1970s and researchers found that shoppers were generally willing to change their attitudes towards purchases in order to confirm their belief that they were worth the price –and vice versa. Researchers have also found that cognitive dissonance after purchases (a.k.a., “buyer’s remorse”) can be reduced by getting directly involved with the purchasing decision (as opposed to just following the advice of marketing material or salespeople) and taking more time to make the decision can reduce cognitive dissonance. Probably because shoppers can more easily convince themselves that they were well informed and not duped.

The answer is yes. You get what you pay for.

Turns. Out.